How to find the perfect guest for your podcast

One of the pain points of running an interview-style podcast is keeping a constant flow of high-quality, willing guests. 

On top of coming up with topic ideas, running the interviews, producing the podcast, and doing all the administration that goes along with it, quite often you can find yourself with an impending deadline but no guests in sight! 

If you are looking to ease the stress, and start getting ahead of the game, here are our tips to start filling up your guest pipeline: 

1. Ask your network

Your audience tunes into your podcast because they have an interest in your topic. And because of this, the likelihood is that they also listen to other podcasts, tune into radio, watch TV shows and read about the topic too. 

Tap into their interest and knowledge in this area; ask your audience for recommendations for your next podcast guest. Who knows, one of your audience members may even be an expert in your topic and put their hand up themselves. 

Also think about what other networks you could tap into. Perhaps you’re active on LinkedIn? Pose the question to your connections. Or, you have some colleagues or referral partners that you work with? Ask them what they’d be interested in tuning in to.

Asking your network also ensures that there is genuine interest in your guest and topic, ensuring that the episode will be a hit. 

2. Stalk similar podcasts 

This suggestion is to let the other podcasts do your research for you. 

Take a look at podcasts that are similar to yours, be it in the same industry, topic or niche, and get inspired by their guest list. 

If you find a guest that you like, listen to their episode, research them online and reach out to appear on your show. If they have appeared on another podcast recently, it is likely that they are interested in the publicity and would appreciate the opportunity. 

3. Head to a directory 

Many people don’t realise that there are people out there searching for media opportunities. In fact, there are many websites dedicated to exactly this, where people can list themselves and their expert topics. 

Here are some of our favourite directories for researching and finding your next podcast guest: 

Matchmaker.FM 

Matchmaker.FM is a website that helps connect podcasts and potential guests. 

Unlike other publicity websites, this one is specifically for podcasts so you can be confident that the people listed on the site will be comfortable recording a podcast. 

Check out Matchmaker.FM here.

Source Bottle 

Source Bottle is a platform where you can either browse the listings or create your own call out for a specific topic.  

While Source Bottle is not specifically for podcast guests, it is a great place to find people who have put their hand up as experts in their topic areas. 

Many of the people listed on this site also have their own podcasts and are public speakers. As a result, they would be comfortable being guests on your podcast. 

Check out Source Bottle here.

4. Contact a PR Agency 

Public Relations (PR) agencies are often desperately looking for opportunities for the talent that they represent. So, contacting a PR agency and offering the chance to be on your podcast can often be a win-win. 

When approaching an agency, be clear about what your podcast is about and who would be an ideal guest. The more specific you are, the better, as this will help them narrow down their search. 

Don’t be afraid to be picky and say no to suggested guests if they aren’t the right fit or are off-topic. 

 

These are our tried and tested ways to help you invite guests to your podcast show. If you have any other tips or suggestions, be sure to let us know at hello@ohmpod.com.au

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